_celestial railroad

CURRENT EXHIBITION:

Celestial Railroad by Jordan Sullivan

Downtown Photoroom
1933 S Broadway, Suite 1242, 12th Floor

Opening Reception, September 11, 6-9PM

September - November, 2015

“... this is a love letter to you and to her and him and my mother and the lost girls. This is a song for the ones who left ‘cause we all leave someday and go alone. This is a dream of something different than paradise: lifelong wants, empty edens, personal wars, celestial battlefields, brief moments of calm in-between and the sad beasts of our modern nothing, the black and blue moonlight and the shadow of you reaching back but not for me. A convergence of birds. The ruins of our moment. Love is revolt. Impermanence gives me hope. We are lost in a broken world... billions of jars of light staring into a void.” – Jordan Sullivan

DOWNTOWN PHOTOROOM is pleased to present the first solo exhibition in Los Angeles by LA-based artist Jordan Sullivan. Sullivan will present a showing of two recent projects: The Burial Cloud and An Island In The Moon.

The Burial Cloud is a conceptual letter to Sullivan’s mother that examines her experience as a teenage rape victim in Petacalco, Mexico in 1973 through seven paintings and seven assemblages. Sullivan used curios of his mother’s, found objects, dirt and paint to create an ethereal installation that examines survival, the bonds of love and the weight of violence. The paintings recall the performative qualities of action painting, though they function as representations of his mothers life and internal struggles. This tension between the abstract and the representational is the cornerstone of much of Sullivan's work.

An Island In the Moon examines the ephemeral mechanics of beauty and nature through natural objects and various photographic processes presented on old paper and printed in a variety of scales. The show is displayed as a constellation of objects and images scattered across the floor and wall. It is a taxonomy of decayed wood, collages, miniature photographs in matchboxes and of the female form. His examination of the natural juxtaposed with the female form gives a dignity to the body seldom presented.